Dockers Containers & Kubernetes

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Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of applications inside software containers, by providing an additional layer of abstraction and automation of operating-system-level virtualization on Linux.[2] Docker uses resource isolation features of the Linux kernel such as cgroups and kernel namespaces to allow independent “containers” to run within a single Linux instance, avoiding the overhead of starting and maintaining virtual machines.[3]
The Linux kernel’s support for namespaces mostly[4] isolates an application’s view of the operating environment, including process trees, network, user IDs and mounted file systems, while the kernel’s cgroups provide resource isolation, including the CPU, memory, block I/O and network. Since version 0.9, Docker includes the libcontainer library as its own way to directly use virtualization facilities provided by the Linux kernel, in addition to using abstracted virtualization interfaces via libvirt, LXC (Linux Containers) and systemd-nspawn.[5][6][7]
According to industry analyst firm 451 Research, “Docker is a tool that can package an application and its dependencies in a virtual container that can run on any Linux server. This helps enable flexibility and portability on where the application can run, whether on premise [sic], public cloud, private cloud, bare metal, etc.”[8]
Docker implements a high-level API to provide lightweight containers that run processes in isolation.[9] Building on top of facilities provided by the Linux kernel (primarily cgroups and namespaces), a Docker container, as opposed to a traditional virtual machine, does not require or include a separate operating system.[8] Instead, it relies on the kernel’s functionality and uses resource isolation (CPU, memory, block I/O, network, etc.) and separate namespaces to isolate the application’s view of the operating system. Docker accesses the Linux kernel’s virtualization features either directly through the provided libcontainer…

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One comment

  • Nice guy, bad talk, too much unfocused talking. Stick to the core points of communicating what this is, don't need to hear about mesos and HP, etc. Teach us what this is. Don't need to hear about whether this is for us nor not. Stay on point. This talk does really show value until it starts talking about pods at around 18:00 Check Tim Hockin instead.

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